Software I've Done

1990-1996:  R&D work on wireless, mobile systems, 2-d barcodes for the US DOT/Federal Highway Administration in Boise and Denver.  An awesome job overall except for pay. 1997: A fraudulent project for City of Las Vegas, managed by Thirdwave Corp, which eventually made newspaper headlines.  It took me

1990-1996:  R&D work on wireless, mobile systems, 2-d barcodes for the US DOT/Federal Highway Administration in Boise and Denver.  An awesome job overall except for pay.

1997: A fraudulent project for City of Las Vegas, managed by Thirdwave Corp, which eventually made newspaper headlines.  It took me months to figure out what was going on, deputy mayor was fired for payoffs, etc.

1998-2000: CRM software at a Phoenix startup, Saleslogix, which issued an IPO in 2000 but spent it all in a year and failed.

2000-2003: Quote2Order and ecommerce sites for Avnet in Phoenix, volunteered for a layoff.  In retrospect, it was a decent place and Q2O was a big success.

2003: Supply chain software at Sunhill Software, a spin-off of vCommerce in Phoenix, closed down after six months.

2004: Sales catalog for Nike, mutual fund management for Standard Insurance in Portland which turned out well, overall.

2005: Traffic control software for Roper in Phoenix, mostly as a favor to previous co-workers.

2005: Consulting company in NYC.  I was part of a new office in Washington, DC which never happened.   I did a ring-tone QA project at Verizon headquarters in NJ, and a systems migration at JP Morgan in NYC.

2006: Insurance software for Unigard Insurance in Seattle.  This project turned out quite well, possibly my best project.

2007: 90-day contract to add a Hibernate layer to billing app at Cingular in Bothell.   Layer was okay but this was mostly a training exercise for two new developers.

2007: Supply chain software at Cisco in San Francisco which was canceled, customer support software for Boeing in Seattle which turned out okay.  My employer, Infosys, was engaged in various frauds, etc and I left when they wanted me to participate.

2008: Health insurance software for Sheridan in Ft Lauderdale.  Project was sabotaged by an employee and CTO was fired.

2010: Ecommerce site for T-Mobile in Bothell.   Lots of confusion on a month-to-month contract, never got a signoff to make the project happen.  One employee told me "T-mobile is the world's largest startup company".

2011: Health care software at Aetna in Hartford, CT.   My manager harassed me constantly, tried to force me to work unpaid overtime.  Pretty sure he got fired but this was one of my more successful projects.

2012: Telecom software for Amdocs in Seattle, EHR software for Harris in Washington, DC.  Amdocs did a reorg and laid off my team.   The EHR project was a weird government bid and shut down shortly after I left.

2013: Cable tv control at Cablelabs in Denver, health awareness software at Gloo in Boulder.  The Cablelabs project was an attempt by a director to keep his job (he failed), Gloo wanted to convert me to born-again Christianity.

2014: Several weeks on a tokenized payment system in an anonymized email application.   Never got paid, mostly about tricking me into free consulting.

2015: Ecommerce site for Staples in Seattle.  I decided to leave after a year, my original manager was fired in my 3rd week.  I wasn't surprised when everyone got laid off in 2017.

2016-17: OTT video control system for DLVR in Tempe.  Best job I'd had since 2003, interesting work, big quiet office and then my sister died.

2018: Crypto currency for Sila in Portland which never got any venture capital funding.

2019: Nike.  Chinese fire drill and I'm not Chinese.

The most depressing aspect of my career is the level of fraud, bad faith, hidden agendas that I encountered.   I was pretty naive for the first ten years.  A lot of bad decision-making which made no sense to me at the time.  You're either focused on delivering a product or you're focused on something else and something else came up too often.   The Cisco project was particularly insane, I said so in a meeting, which is probably partly why it was shut down.

I took much more risk than the average developer and it rarely paid off.  I wasn't paranoid enough about people.

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